Nov 17, 2012

Posted in Uncategorized

Instant Analysis: Closing Address by Justice Scalia at #FedSoc2012

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I am over my tweet limit?! My running comments of Justice Scala’s address, will begin at 4:15 till 5:00 here.

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  • Steve Rappoport

    “Court must follow statute, but Congress can’t enact general law to
    dictate rules of interpretation that courts must apply. “that’s our
    job” ”

    I believe that one of the first Acts of Congress, the Judiciary Act of 1789, enacted “general law to dictate rules of interpretation.”

    I know for a fact that Congress can, in any given statute, spell out how the text should be interpreted (or not). I fail to see why Congress lacks the authority to declare how the words that it duly enacts into law should be construed. For instance, why can it not lay down a principle that, when there is doubt, a particular point of view should prevail?

  • Steve Rappoport

    “Court must follow statute, but Congress can’t enact general law to
    dictate rules of interpretation that courts must apply. “that’s our
    job” ”

    I believe that one of the first Acts of Congress, the Judiciary Act of 1789, enacted “general law to dictate rules of interpretation.”

    I know for a fact that Congress can, in any given statute, spell out how the text should be interpreted (or not). I fail to see why Congress lacks the authority to declare how the words that it duly enacts into law should be construed. For instance, why can it not lay down a principle that, when there is doubt, a particular point of view should prevail?

  • Steve Rappoport

    “Court must follow statute, but Congress can’t enact general law to
    dictate rules of interpretation that courts must apply. “that’s our
    job” ”

    I believe that one of the first Acts of Congress, the Judiciary Act of 1789, enacted “general law to dictate rules of interpretation.”

    I know for a fact that Congress can, in any given statute, spell out how the text should be interpreted (or not). I fail to see why Congress lacks the authority to declare how the words that it duly enacts into law should be construed. For instance, why can it not lay down a principle that, when there is doubt, a particular point of view should prevail?

  • Steve Rappoport

    “Court must follow statute, but Congress can’t enact general law to
    dictate rules of interpretation that courts must apply. “that’s our
    job” ”

    I believe that one of the first Acts of Congress, the Judiciary Act of 1789, enacted “general law to dictate rules of interpretation.”

    I know for a fact that Congress can, in any given statute, spell out how the text should be interpreted (or not). I fail to see why Congress lacks the authority to declare how the words that it duly enacts into law should be construed. For instance, why can it not lay down a principle that, when there is doubt, a particular point of view should prevail?

  • Steve Rappoport

    “Court must follow statute, but Congress can’t enact general law to
    dictate rules of interpretation that courts must apply. “that’s our
    job” ”

    I believe that one of the first Acts of Congress, the Judiciary Act of 1789, enacted “general law to dictate rules of interpretation.”

    I know for a fact that Congress can, in any given statute, spell out how the text should be interpreted (or not). I fail to see why Congress lacks the authority to declare how the words that it duly enacts into law should be construed. For instance, why can it not lay down a principle that, when there is doubt, a particular point of view should prevail?

  • Steve Rappoport

    “Court must follow statute, but Congress can’t enact general law to
    dictate rules of interpretation that courts must apply. “that’s our
    job” ”

    I believe that one of the first Acts of Congress, the Judiciary Act of 1789, enacted “general law to dictate rules of interpretation.”

    I know for a fact that Congress can, in any given statute, spell out how the text should be interpreted (or not). I fail to see why Congress lacks the authority to declare how the words that it duly enacts into law should be construed. For instance, why can it not lay down a principle that, when there is doubt, a particular point of view should prevail?

  • Steve Rappoport

    “Court must follow statute, but Congress can’t enact general law to
    dictate rules of interpretation that courts must apply. “that’s our
    job” ”

    I believe that one of the first Acts of Congress, the Judiciary Act of 1789, enacted “general law to dictate rules of interpretation.”

    I know for a fact that Congress can, in any given statute, spell out how the text should be interpreted (or not). I fail to see why Congress lacks the authority to declare how the words that it duly enacts into law should be construed. For instance, why can it not lay down a principle that, when there is doubt, a particular point of view should prevail?

  • Steve Rappoport

    “Court must follow statute, but Congress can’t enact general law to
    dictate rules of interpretation that courts must apply. “that’s our
    job” ”

    I believe that one of the first Acts of Congress, the Judiciary Act of 1789, enacted “general law to dictate rules of interpretation.”

    I know for a fact that Congress can, in any given statute, spell out how the text should be interpreted (or not). I fail to see why Congress lacks the authority to declare how the words that it duly enacts into law should be construed. For instance, why can it not lay down a principle that, when there is doubt, a particular point of view should prevail?

  • Steve Rappoport

    “Court must follow statute, but Congress can’t enact general law to
    dictate rules of interpretation that courts must apply. “that’s our
    job” ”

    I believe that one of the first Acts of Congress, the Judiciary Act of 1789, enacted “general law to dictate rules of interpretation.”

    I know for a fact that Congress can, in any given statute, spell out how the text should be interpreted (or not). I fail to see why Congress lacks the authority to declare how the words that it duly enacts into law should be construed. For instance, why can it not lay down a principle that, when there is doubt, a particular point of view should prevail?

  • Steve Rappoport

    “Court must follow statute, but Congress can’t enact general law to
    dictate rules of interpretation that courts must apply. “that’s our
    job” ”

    I believe that one of the first Acts of Congress, the Judiciary Act of 1789, enacted “general law to dictate rules of interpretation.”

    I know for a fact that Congress can, in any given statute, spell out how the text should be interpreted (or not). I fail to see why Congress lacks the authority to declare how the words that it duly enacts into law should be construed. For instance, why can it not lay down a principle that, when there is doubt, a particular point of view should prevail?

  • Steve Rappoport

    “Court must follow statute, but Congress can’t enact general law to
    dictate rules of interpretation that courts must apply. “that’s our
    job” ”

    I believe that one of the first Acts of Congress, the Judiciary Act of 1789, enacted “general law to dictate rules of interpretation.”

    I know for a fact that Congress can, in any given statute, spell out how the text should be interpreted (or not). I fail to see why Congress lacks the authority to declare how the words that it duly enacts into law should be construed. For instance, why can it not lay down a principle that, when there is doubt, a particular point of view should prevail?

  • Steve Rappoport

    “Court must follow statute, but Congress can’t enact general law to
    dictate rules of interpretation that courts must apply. “that’s our
    job” ”

    I believe that one of the first Acts of Congress, the Judiciary Act of 1789, enacted “general law to dictate rules of interpretation.”

    I know for a fact that Congress can, in any given statute, spell out how the text should be interpreted (or not). I fail to see why Congress lacks the authority to declare how the words that it duly enacts into law should be construed. For instance, why can it not lay down a principle that, when there is doubt, a particular point of view should prevail?

  • Steve Rappoport

    “Court must follow statute, but Congress can’t enact general law to
    dictate rules of interpretation that courts must apply. “that’s our
    job” ”

    I believe that one of the first Acts of Congress, the Judiciary Act of 1789, enacted “general law to dictate rules of interpretation.”

    I know for a fact that Congress can, in any given statute, spell out how the text should be interpreted (or not). I fail to see why Congress lacks the authority to declare how the words that it duly enacts into law should be construed. For instance, why can it not lay down a principle that, when there is doubt, a particular point of view should prevail?

  • Steve Rappoport

    “Court must follow statute, but Congress can’t enact general law to
    dictate rules of interpretation that courts must apply. “that’s our
    job” ”

    I believe that one of the first Acts of Congress, the Judiciary Act of 1789, enacted “general law to dictate rules of interpretation.”

    I know for a fact that Congress can, in any given statute, spell out how the text should be interpreted (or not). I fail to see why Congress lacks the authority to declare how the words that it duly enacts into law should be construed. For instance, why can it not lay down a principle that, when there is doubt, a particular point of view should prevail?

  • Steve Rappoport

    “Court must follow statute, but Congress can’t enact general law to
    dictate rules of interpretation that courts must apply. “that’s our
    job” ”

    I believe that one of the first Acts of Congress, the Judiciary Act of 1789, enacted “general law to dictate rules of interpretation.”

    I know for a fact that Congress can, in any given statute, spell out how the text should be interpreted (or not). I fail to see why Congress lacks the authority to declare how the words that it duly enacts into law should be construed. For instance, why can it not lay down a principle that, when there is doubt, a particular point of view should prevail?

  • Steve Rappoport

    “Court must follow statute, but Congress can’t enact general law to
    dictate rules of interpretation that courts must apply. “that’s our
    job” ”

    I believe that one of the first Acts of Congress, the Judiciary Act of 1789, enacted “general law to dictate rules of interpretation.”

    I know for a fact that Congress can, in any given statute, spell out how the text should be interpreted (or not). I fail to see why Congress lacks the authority to declare how the words that it duly enacts into law should be construed. For instance, why can it not lay down a principle that, when there is doubt, a particular point of view should prevail?

  • Steve Rappoport

    “Court must follow statute, but Congress can’t enact general law to
    dictate rules of interpretation that courts must apply. “that’s our
    job” ”

    I believe that one of the first Acts of Congress, the Judiciary Act of 1789, enacted “general law to dictate rules of interpretation.”

    I know for a fact that Congress can, in any given statute, spell out how the text should be interpreted (or not). I fail to see why Congress lacks the authority to declare how the words that it duly enacts into law should be construed. For instance, why can it not lay down a principle that, when there is doubt, a particular point of view should prevail?

  • Steve Rappoport

    “Court must follow statute, but Congress can’t enact general law to
    dictate rules of interpretation that courts must apply. “that’s our
    job” ”

    I believe that one of the first Acts of Congress, the Judiciary Act of 1789, enacted “general law to dictate rules of interpretation.”

    I know for a fact that Congress can, in any given statute, spell out how the text should be interpreted (or not). I fail to see why Congress lacks the authority to declare how the words that it duly enacts into law should be construed. For instance, why can it not lay down a principle that, when there is doubt, a particular point of view should prevail?

  • Steve Rappoport

    “Court must follow statute, but Congress can’t enact general law to
    dictate rules of interpretation that courts must apply. “that’s our
    job” ”

    I believe that one of the first Acts of Congress, the Judiciary Act of 1789, enacted “general law to dictate rules of interpretation.”

    I know for a fact that Congress can, in any given statute, spell out how the text should be interpreted (or not). I fail to see why Congress lacks the authority to declare how the words that it duly enacts into law should be construed. For instance, why can it not lay down a principle that, when there is doubt, a particular point of view should prevail?

  • Steve Rappoport

    “Court must follow statute, but Congress can’t enact general law to
    dictate rules of interpretation that courts must apply. “that’s our
    job” ”

    I believe that one of the first Acts of Congress, the Judiciary Act of 1789, enacted “general law to dictate rules of interpretation.”

    I know for a fact that Congress can, in any given statute, spell out how the text should be interpreted (or not). I fail to see why Congress lacks the authority to declare how the words that it duly enacts into law should be construed. For instance, why can it not lay down a principle that, when there is doubt, a particular point of view should prevail?

  • Steve Rappoport

    “Court must follow statute, but Congress can’t enact general law to
    dictate rules of interpretation that courts must apply. “that’s our
    job” ”

    I believe that one of the first Acts of Congress, the Judiciary Act of 1789, enacted “general law to dictate rules of interpretation.”

    I know for a fact that Congress can, in any given statute, spell out how the text should be interpreted (or not). I fail to see why Congress lacks the authority to declare how the words that it duly enacts into law should be construed. For instance, why can it not lay down a principle that, when there is doubt, a particular point of view should prevail?

  • Steve Rappoport

    “Court must follow statute, but Congress can’t enact general law to
    dictate rules of interpretation that courts must apply. “that’s our
    job” ”

    I believe that one of the first Acts of Congress, the Judiciary Act of 1789, enacted “general law to dictate rules of interpretation.”

    I know for a fact that Congress can, in any given statute, spell out how the text should be interpreted (or not). I fail to see why Congress lacks the authority to declare how the words that it duly enacts into law should be construed. For instance, why can it not lay down a principle that, when there is doubt, a particular point of view should prevail?

  • Steve Rappoport

    “Court must follow statute, but Congress can’t enact general law to
    dictate rules of interpretation that courts must apply. “that’s our
    job” ”

    I believe that one of the first Acts of Congress, the Judiciary Act of 1789, enacted “general law to dictate rules of interpretation.”

    I know for a fact that Congress can, in any given statute, spell out how the text should be interpreted (or not). I fail to see why Congress lacks the authority to declare how the words that it duly enacts into law should be construed. For instance, why can it not lay down a principle that, when there is doubt, a particular point of view should prevail?

  • Steve Rappoport

    “Court must follow statute, but Congress can’t enact general law to
    dictate rules of interpretation that courts must apply. “that’s our
    job” ”

    I believe that one of the first Acts of Congress, the Judiciary Act of 1789, enacted “general law to dictate rules of interpretation.”

    I know for a fact that Congress can, in any given statute, spell out how the text should be interpreted (or not). I fail to see why Congress lacks the authority to declare how the words that it duly enacts into law should be construed. For instance, why can it not lay down a principle that, when there is doubt, a particular point of view should prevail?

  • Steve Rappoport

    “Court must follow statute, but Congress can’t enact general law to
    dictate rules of interpretation that courts must apply. “that’s our
    job” ”

    I believe that one of the first Acts of Congress, the Judiciary Act of 1789, enacted “general law to dictate rules of interpretation.”

    I know for a fact that Congress can, in any given statute, spell out how the text should be interpreted (or not). I fail to see why Congress lacks the authority to declare how the words that it duly enacts into law should be construed. For instance, why can it not lay down a principle that, when there is doubt, a particular point of view should prevail?

  • Steve Rappoport

    “Court must follow statute, but Congress can’t enact general law to
    dictate rules of interpretation that courts must apply. “that’s our
    job” ”

    I believe that one of the first Acts of Congress, the Judiciary Act of 1789, enacted “general law to dictate rules of interpretation.”

    I know for a fact that Congress can, in any given statute, spell out how the text should be interpreted (or not). I fail to see why Congress lacks the authority to declare how the words that it duly enacts into law should be construed. For instance, why can it not lay down a principle that, when there is doubt, a particular point of view should prevail?