Jan 28, 2014

“Neck Doily” as Slang for “Jabot” In Black’s Law Dictionary

Share Button

Bryan Garner just made my day when he tweeted the draft definition for “jabot” in the next edition of Black’s Law Dictionary. It says “Also termed (slang) neck doily.”

I think I may have coined a word!

I first used the phrase “neck doily” in this post from October 2009 noting that Justice Sotomayor was not wearing the “neck doily” that Justice Ginsburg gave her. At some point earlier, I made a joke to a friend about Justice Ginsburg’s frilly jabot. I said something to the effect of, “Is she a Justice or a tea cup? Why is she wearing a doily around her neck.” And, it stuck. Above The Law adopted the usage back in 2010. I’m even cited as a footnote on Wikipedia for jabot!

Since then I’ve (somehow) published about two dozen posts on the neck doily. Justice Kagan wore a neck doily in her first Supreme Court portrait, and during her investiture, but not during her first day on the bench. Kagan later said of the jabot, “In my real life I’m not a frilly, lacy person.” Though all the female Justices wore some kind of neck accoutrements (somewhere between a scarf and a doily) while sitting for their portrait. Then there was the time Justice Ginsburg swapped her neck doily for some bling, and the blue neck doily for the same-sex wedding she officiated at.

If this is my only contribution to the English language, I will be happy.

Share Button

Read More
Nov 4, 2013

Is a Neck Doily Clothes?

Share Button

In Sandifer v. United States Steel Corp. (12-417), Eric Schnapper listed several forms of courtroom attire. He even mentioned the neck brace! But he omitted the neck doily.

In ordinary parlance, not everything an individual wears would be referred to as clothes. There are examples of that in this courtroom: Glasses, necklaces, earrings, wristwatches. There may be a toupee for all we know. Those things are not commonly referred to as clothes.

Personally, I think of it more as a garnish.

And for lol, Justice Scalia took umbrage that someone in the Court wore a toupee!

JUSTICE SCALIA: I resent that.

(Laughter.)

Totally serious question for anyone who knows. Is the neck doily put on in the robing room? Does RBG keep a slew of them there? Or are they kept in chambers? Does she ever dither on which one to pick? How long does a neck doily take to put on? If anyone knows the answer, you know where to reach me.

Share Button

Read More
Oct 28, 2013

Neck Doily Fashion for O’Connor, Ginsburg, Sotomayor, and Kagan

Share Button

The new portrait of Justices O’Connor, Ginsburg, Sotomayor, and Kagan offers four views of the neck doily. Here is how Tony Mauro describes it:

A seated Justice Sandra Day O’Connor and Justice Sonia Sotomayor, seen standing behind her, look somber, while Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg, seated next to O’Connor, and Justice Elena Kagan, standing next to Sotomayor, have faint smiles. They are wearing their black robes, with differing neckwear that accurately reflects their preferences.

O’Connor is wearing a sailor-suit neck doily. RBG is wearing the standard round teacup neck doily. Justice Sotomayor has no discernible neck accoutrement (not even the one RBG gave her). Justice Kagan rocks the subtle neck liner. Though she wore one at first, she soon stopped. She later said that she is not a frilly, lacy person.

portrait

Update: The Washington Post has a better photo of the painting. Justice Sotomayor is in fact wearing some kind of turtleneck neck doily.

4justices

Share Button

Read More
Sep 30, 2013

RBG Sports Stylish Blue Neck Doily in Another Same-Sex Wedding

Share Button

rbg-doilyRBG is branching out in neck-doily style.

Front and center was Associate Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg of the Supreme Court, performing her second gay ceremony following the court’s decision striking down laws that had denied federal benefits to same-sex spouses. The importance of her presence and the setting — the roof of Fiola restaurant in Washington, with a panoramic view stretching from the Capitol to the White House — was not lost on the 100 assembled guests. …

But who would officiate? Then they read an interview with Justice Ginsburg, in which she said she had never been asked to perform a same-sex wedding. They asked, and on the day the court invalidated DOMA, she agreed to marry the couple.

At the ceremony, Justice Ginsburg described the couple’s love as “universal” and “human nature,” and expressed hope that it would make them “magically more wiser and richer in experience, happier than either would be alone.”

Yet somehow, the Times originally misspelled her name. Look at this ghastly correction:

Correction: September 29, 2013

An earlier version of a picture caption with this article misspelled the name of the Supreme Court justice who performed the wedding ceremony. She is Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg, not Gisnburg.

Share Button

Read More
May 28, 2013

RBG with a Golden Neck Doily?

Share Button

What fashion statement is she making today?

gold-neck-doily

Update: We have an update from Court artist himself, Art Lien:

There you have it. It’s gold and thick.

And more from Michelle Olson:

Share Button

Read More
Nov 26, 2012

Breaking: Justice Ginsburg “Neck Doily” Watch – RBG Swaps Jabot for Bling!

Share Button

Earth-shattering news from the Supreme Court, courtesy of Robert Barnes:

I hope someone got a sketch of that! For more on the Jabot (or as I call it the neck doily) see these posts.

Update: Thanks to the inestimable Art Lien, we now have a sketch of Justice Ginsburg “forgo[ing] the jabot.”

Here are Art’s comments:

One thing a sketch artist at the Supreme Court needs to look for is whether Justice Ginsburg is wearing a jabot or one of her increasingly large doilies around her neck. Today, for the first time I can recall, she wore neither. She appeared to be wearing a sparkly necklace of dark crystals. I couldn’t quite make it out.

Bling Bling!

Update: WaPo Reliable Sources has the scoop on RBG’s new bling.

Time to bust out your holiday-season bling — and that goes for you Supreme Court justices, too!Ruth Bader Ginsburg turned some heads Monday when she showed up in court wearing a big shiny necklace with her robe instead of her usual frilly white jabot. We’re told that the bib-style sparkler (glass beads on a black scalloped base) was a Banana Republic offering that came in the VIP gift bag at Glamour magazine’s “Women of the Year”gala in New York this month, where Ginsburg was among the honorees. (Sorry, no photo: Cameras aren’t allowed in the court.)

Swanky. Here is a pic from Banana Republic’s web site:

H/T DC Dicta

Share Button

Read More
Dec 27, 2010

Kagan on not wearing a Neck Doily – “In my real life I’m not a frilly, lacy person.”

Share Button

Justice Kagan sat down for a lengthy interview on C-SPAN. At 27:33, she is asked about her decision not to wear a neck doily. For those of you outside the SCOTUSphere, the neck doily is the frilly lacy thing that Justice Ginsburg wears around her neck (for more on the doily, see here, here, and here). Here is what Justice Kagan had to say:

“I think you just have to do what makes you feel comfortable. In my real life I’m not a frilly, lacy person. Some of the things people wear just struck me as not something I felt comfortable with. I have, on occasion, worn a white scarf under my robe. I have worn that for all of our pictures and my investiture. I wear pearls a lot. I think the robe is a symbol of the impersonality of the law.”

There you have it.

Update: Thanks for the link Above The Law, and picking up my usage of the term “neck doily!”

Share Button

Read More
Oct 4, 2010

Update: Justice Kagan is *not* wearing a Neck Doily

Share Button

Although Justice Kagan wore a neck doily during her investiture, she did not wear one during oral arguments.

H/T Art Lien

Share Button

Read More
Oct 1, 2010

Breaking News: Justice Kagan is wearing a Neck Doily

Share Button

I suppose the answer to my previous question is yes.

Share Button

Read More
Aug 7, 2010

Will Justice Kagan Wear a Neck Doily?

Share Button

Back in June I queried whether Justice Kagan will wear a neck doily. Brian Palmer at Slate posed the same question, though he called it a “frilly neckpiece.” Apparently it is really called a jabot.

Merry olde England. U.S. Federal judges, including Supreme Court justices, can wear pretty much anything they like—they can even go in jeans and t-shirts—but the simple black robe has been de rigueur for those on the federal bench since the early 19th century. (Some state courts continue to wear variations, like red robes on the Maryland Court of Appeals and gray for the justices of the Georgia Supreme Court.) The V-neck on a standard judicial gown hangs a little low, which isn’t a problem for men, since it exposes their shirt-collar and necktie. Women’s wear doesn’t have a consistent neckline, so many female judges seek some kind of neck adornment to cover the gap. Some of them look to England, where male and female judges alike still wear a two-banded ribbon atop their robes. The accessory is still au courant in several former English colonies, like Canada and Zimbabwe, as well.

ot all female judges take this route. Seventh Circuit Judge Diane Wood, whom President Obama also considered for the Supreme Court, often prefers a brooch to going all frilly. Another option is simply to adjust your personal attire to accommodate the robe’s plunging neckline and skip the accessorizing altogether. Judge Kimba Wood of the Second Circuit, for example, tends to wear a crew neck under her gown. Justice Sonia Sotomayor also prefers anunadorned judicial robe with a higher collar underneath. She received a jabot as a gift from Justice Ginsburg, but doesn’t usually wear it during oral argument. (No word yet on who will gift Kagan with a jabot, or whether she will wear it.)

Some judges, like Kim McLane Wardlaw of the Ninth Circuit, close the robe’s neckline completely, eliminating the need for an accessory. While judges typically order their polyester garments from online retailers—high-end versions cost around $400—Wardlaw had a Hollywood designer create her unique robes.

Slate also included a nice photoshopped image.

Share Button

Read More
Jun 3, 2010

The Most Important Question for Elena Kagan – Will she wear a Neck Doily?

Share Button

One of my first blog posts dealt with the Neck Doily–or whatever that collar thing Justice Ginsburg wears around her neck is called. Justice Ginsburg gave Justice Sotomayor a neck doily to welcome her to the Court. Although Justice Sotomayor wore it in the official SCOTUS group photo, she did not wear it in her individual photo, and she does not wear it during oral arguments.

So, the most important question that Elena Kagan should be asked, is whether she will wear a neck doily on the bench.

Now Kagan was notoriously coy about whether she would wear the traditional Solicitor General Morning Coat. So it is likely she would not answer any questions about her attire on the bench. It is also likely that she will not answer any questions about actually being a Justice.

Only time will tell.

Share Button

Read More
Oct 5, 2009

SCOTUS Inside Scoop: Sotomayor was not wearing the Collar/Neck Doily Ginsburg gave her

Share Button

In perhaps the most important SCOTUS fashion development since Solicitor General Kagan’s non-Morning Coat attire, I just heard from someone who attended oral arguments that Justice Sotomayor was not wearing the Collar/Neck Doily Justice Ginsburg gave her.

Although she wore the Collar in the group photo:

She did not wear it in her individual photo, unlike Justice Ginsburg

Ginsburg with Collar

Sotomayor without Collar

Could this serve as a bone of contention between the two female Justices? Or maybe Justice Sotomayor, who never wore the Neck Doily on the 2nd Circuit, just didn’t like the fashion. We shall see.

Share Button

Read More
Mar 1, 2014

Video: Obamacare in One Lesson

Share Button

In my constitutional law class, I gave a condensed lecture on all aspects of NFIB v. Sebelius from start to finish. The video runs three hours in length, but covers everything from start to finish. (As it turns out, I led off class by playing the video of the guy who snuck the camera into court). I also may or may not have announced that I am the proud owner of my very own neck doily. If you have some time, you will enjoy this.

Share Button

Read More
Jan 29, 2014

Ruth Vader Ginsburg

Share Button

The force is strong with this neck doily.

rvg

Via LadyPuns

Share Button

Read More
Jan 27, 2014

David Lat Has Coined Three Words in Black’s Law Dictionary (and I got a slang tweet from Garner)

Share Button

Kudos to David Lat for coning three new words added to the newest edition of Black’s Law Dictionary: bench-slap, judicial diva, and litigatrix.

And, Bryan Garner confirmed that “neck doily” is now slang for Jabot!

 

And “doily” is preferred to “doiley.”

Share Button

Read More
Dec 27, 2013

RBG Officiating at Same-Sex Wedding Chosen in NYT Year in Pictures

Share Button

Has anyone seen this picture before? I follow these things closely, and I don’t recall this pic. It seems that RBG is wearing a very festive, almost rainbow colored neck doily?

rbg-ssm

Share Button

Read More
Oct 29, 2013

My Non-Artist Take on the Portrait of the Four Female Justices

Share Button

4justicesLet me preface this by saying I have absolutely no artistic taste. I have no idea what I’m talking about. I don’t know art. I know the Justices. And I don’t like it.

Let’s start with reverse seniority. I don’t like, at all, what the painter did with Justice Kagan. In real life, she is so vibrant and energetic, exuding this whimsical snark, as if she was going to Socratically corner you any moment. The portrait conveys her as dull and lifeless. Her shoulders are slouched. Her hair looks unkempt. She looks bored and disengaged, almost as if she doesn’t fit in with the three other distinguished Justices. She almost fades into the shadows. We can’t even see her hands. Plus her neck doily sags into nowhere. And she is in the center of the portrait. When I look at the portrait, my eyes are drawn right to Kagan’s face. I can’t imagine she is happy with this.

Justice Sotomayor, in contrast, looks fierce. She has a very sharp look, gazing right into the (figurative) lens. Her shoulders are strong, and the stitches on her robes make it clear she is asserting herself. Unlike Kagan, her hands are visible on top of the couch. She is learning towards the other Justices, unlike Kagan who seems to be shirking, and fading into the background. The turtleneck neck doily contours her visage. It’s a good depiction.

Justice Ginsburg looks so stodgy. Her hands are clasped tightly, as if she is not open, at all. In reality she is such a welcoming person. The artist did not capture the spark in that frail frame we all adore. Her teacup neck doily dwarfs her face. She is looking forcefully at the lens, with no emotion.

Justice O’Connor looks like she got an eye-lift or botox something. Her eyebrows are arched upwards in an odd way. She also has this school-girl, doe-eyed look to her. I don’t see at all the strong persona that she has exuded for  three decades on the bench. Though the way her hands are laid depicts warmth, which is right on. I do enjoy the detail put into her sailor-suit neck doily.

On the whole, I don’t like it. Again, this is my purely non artistic opinion.

Share Button

Read More
Oct 15, 2013

RBG Nail Art

Share Button

I can’t even. This is real. With a neck doily!

RBG-nail

H/T Twitter

Share Button

Read More
Jul 25, 2013

I Got My “I <3 RBG” T-Shirt

Share Button

And the <3  is a neck doily!

20130725_214042

Go buy one!

 

Share Button

Read More
Jun 29, 2013

I <3 RBG Shirts

Share Button

I just bought one of these awesome t-shirts. They even got the neck doily right!

rbg

Courtesy of the bad-ass Notorious RBG tumblr.

Share Button

Read More